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White Island

I got to spend a day at the extraordinary island volcano of White Island. Within the breached caldera there were rivers of acid waters flanked by yellow and brown sulfur deposits, a milky green acid lake, cloud-expelling fumaroles, and a surface littered with fumarolic mounds and bombs and ash from the 2000 eruption. All of us who traveled to the island by boat, led by everyone at PeeJays, were amazed.

Short geologic summary from the Bulletin of the Global Volcanism Network: Uninhabited 2 x 2.4 km White Island, one of New Zealand's most active volcanoes, is the emergent summit of a 16 x 18 m submarine volcano in the Bay of Plenty about 50 km offshore of North Island. The 321-m-high island consists of two overlapping andesitic-to-dacitic stratovolcanoes; the summit crater appears to be breached to the SE because the shoreline corresponds to the level of several notches in the SE crater wall. Volckner Rocks, four sea stacks that are remnants of a lava dome, lie 5 km NNE of White Island. Intermittent moderate phreatomagmatic and strombolian eruptions have occurred at White Island throughout the short historical period beginning in 1826, but its activity also forms a prominent part of Maori legends. Formation of many new vents during the 19th and 20th centuries has produced rapid changes in crater floor topography. Collapse of the crater wall in 1914 produced a debris avalanche that buried buildings and workers at a sulfur-mining project.

Videos:

Our awesome guide Jules tells us what's up
Fresh new boiling mud pot
Steamy fumaroles
Acid river in a sulfur landscape
A boiling acid lake
and boiling mud pots!

Pictures are below:

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Please credit Jani Radebaugh for all pictures, thank you!